Dr. Mark Evans is a Fine Fellow

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[Mark Evans and his wife, Cheri, on Mt. Evans (appropriately named) in Colorado]

In Spring 2017, Dr. Mark Evans was elected a Fellow of the Geological Society of America. As described on the GSA website:

“Society Fellowship is an honor bestowed on the best of our profession by election at the spring GSA Council meeting. GSA members are nominated by existing GSA Fellows in recognition of their distinguished contributions to the geosciences through such avenues as publications, applied research, teaching, administration of geological programs, contributing to the public awareness of geology, leadership of professional organizations, and taking on editorial, bibliographic, and library responsibilities.”

One of Dr. Evans nominators, Dr. Charlie Onasch of Bowling Green State University says of Dr. Evans “Mark Evans is a leading authority on the nature and evolution of paleofluids in foreland fold-thrust belts and the interrelationships between fluid flow, diagenesis, paleomagnetism, and both brittle and ductile deformation. He has also excelled in the training of young geologists through classroom experiences and involvement in geological research.” Dr. Evans currently has 38 journal publication, 22 of which are first-author, and 117 meeting abstracts, 35 of which are with undergraduate student first-authors.

Dr. Evans was similarly elected a Fellow of the Geological Society of London in 2012. The Geological Society of London is the first geological society, established in 1811.

The Geological Sciences Department at CCSU congratulates Dr. Evans on this prestigious accomplishment!

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Rocking Ireland for A Good Cause

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[Dr. Piatek at Meteor Crater in Arizona during the 2016 field project]

Dr. Jen Piatek, our planetary geology specialist, is part of a project (funded through NSF’s IUSE: GEOPATHS program) titled “Engaging Students in Inclusive Geoscience Field Experiences via Onsite-Remote Partnerships”. This week, she joins a team of researchers from multiple universities [including Steven J. Whitmeyer and Eric Pyle (James Madison University), Christopher L. Atchison (University of Cincinnati), and Helen Crompton (Old Dominion)] and students for a week of field geology in western Ireland. The project’s goal is to identify techniques and technologies that can provide access to remote field sites for geoscience students with mobility limitations. The first field season took place this past May in northern Arizona (see above picture) with the same students – a video describing the project and the first season is also “live” this week as part of the “STEM for All” Video showcase. The video can be found at http://stemforall2017.videohall.com/presentations/920 – please come by to leave comments, ask questions, and perhaps give the project a vote.

GSCI Students Proudly Present at University Research Day

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[Morrissa Luddy presents her research on contaminated soil at the CCSU University Research and Creative Activity Day]

5 of the 48 undergraduate student posters presented at today’s event originated in the Geological Sciences Department. Along with Morrissa Luddy’s poster “The Uptake of Tract Elements in Lab-Contaminated Soils from Lebanon, CT,” the following research was presented:

Emily Gajda, “Trace Element Analysis and Environmental Impacts of the Roxbury Quarry, Roxbury Connecticut.”

Maxwell Meadows, “Sources and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metals in Agricultural Soils of Lebanon, CT.”

Ian Murphy, “Morphologic Characteristics of the Best-Preserved Martian Craters: Thermophysical Mapping of Gasa and Istok.”

Nicholas Zygmont, “Fracture History of the Weir Mountains Syncline and Lehighton Anticline, Eastern Valley and Ridge Providence, Pennsylvania.”

Congrats to all our talented student researchers!

Picture Yourself at the 2018 NEGSA!

The CCSU Geological Sciences Department enthusiastically thanks the CCSU Student Government Association (SGA) for their continued support of our Geology and Planetary Sciences (GPS) Club. Their financial assistance makes it possible for our students to present their world-class research each year at the Northeast Regional Geological Society of America Conference. To all our student presenters this year, congratulations on a job well done! To the students who cheered them on, the faculty are ready to work with you on YOUR research projects. We look forward to seeing YOU present next year, at the 2018 NEGSA conference in Burlington, VT.

To the CCSU class of 2021, we welcome YOU to get involved in our department, as a major, a minor, or just an interested associate. Membership in the GPS club is open to all CCSU students. Come check us out!

Meanwhile, at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas…. (Updated!)

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[CCSU Geological Sciences alumnae Jessica Johnson (left) and Ali Steullet (center) with faculty member Dr. Jen Piatek]

While much of the department is presenting at the NE Regional Geological Society of America conference, faculty member Dr. Jen Piatek is presenting her work at the Lunar and Planetary Sciences Conference. Here she ran into two of our illustrious alumnae, recent graduate Jessica Johnson (now studying meteorites at the University of New Mexico) and Ali Steullet (now a practicing geologist!). We’re so proud of you, Jess and Ali! Rock on!

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Update! There has been a sighting of alum Keenan Golder (pictured above), who is now working on his Ph.D. at the University of Tennessee.

CCSU Students Keep Rockin’ at Northeast GSA Conference

[Ian Murphy (left) and Melissa Luna and Jackie Giblin (right) presenting their research at NEGSA in Pittsburgh]

Day Two of the Northeast Regional Geological Society of America Conference finds more CCSU students (and alumni) presenting their work. Ian Murphy is highlighting his work on Martian craters, done under the mentorship of Dr. Jen Piatek. You can read his abstract here. Jackie Giblin is presenting work on the geology of Connecticut done with now CCSU alumna Melissa Luna (currently a masters student at Wesleyan) and Dr. Michael Wizevich. Their work can be found here. Congrats to all the student researchers who, once again, prove that CCSU Geology Rocks!

CCSU Once Again Rocks the Northeast Geological Society of America Conference!

[Corbin MacDonald and Nick Zygmont present their research this morning in Pittsburgh]

March brings with it not only Spring Break, but the Northeast regional conference of the Geological Society of America. Once again, CCSU is a dominant player, with 16 students and 3 faculty members in attendance. On the first morning of presentations, Corbin MacDonald and Nick Zygmont present research done on the geology of Pennsylvania (under the mentorship of department chairman Dr. Mark Evans). Read about Corbin’s research here and Nick’s research here. Dr. Evans is also presenting in this same session. His research is described here.

 

 

Students Prepare for Geological Society of America Presentations (Part 1)

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Maxwell Meadows, a senior student in the Department of Geological Sciences, began a study of trace elements enrichment within agricultural farmland of Lebanon, CT under the supervision of Dr. Oyewumi.  He is seen here collecting soil within agricultural farmland with the overall goal of examining trace element enrichment and possible impact on the hydrologic systems. Results of his research will be presented at the forthcoming Northeast Conference of the Geological Society of America in Pittsburgh, PA. You can read Max’s abstract here.

Student Researchers Rock Local Awards

Two Geological Sciences students received scholarship awards from the Environmental Professionals of Connecticut (EPOC). Kristina Landry received $1500. She has spent two, two-week field sessions in western Wyoming and eastern Idaho collecting geologic structure data from the Wyoming salient fold-and-thrust belt. She has also done fluid inclusion microthermometry on mineral samples to determine the deformation conditions during folding. Kristina also made a poster presentation of her research at the northeast section meeting of the Geological Society of America in Albany, NY in March 2016.

Max Meadows received $2000. He has spent the summer collecting soil samples from the Lebanon, Connecticut area in an attempt to document the source of arsenic contamination. He is currently doing geochemical analysis on the samples. Max will present the results of his research at the northeast section meeting of the Geological Society of America meeting in Pittsburgh, PA in March 2017.

We congratulate these two undergraduate researchers.

 

 

Faculty Awarded Grants to Improve Education (and More)

Department faculty members Dr. Jen Piatek (above left) and Dr. Jeff Thomas (above right) were recently awarded nearly a half a million dollars in grants to improve geoscience education and research.

Dr. Piatek, our planetary geology specialist, received two grants. The first is GP-EXTRA: Engaging Students in Inclusive Geoscience Field Experiences via Onsite-Remote Partnerships, a project funded through NSF’s Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Pathways into Geoscience program (IUSE: GEOPATHS). She is part of a team of researchers [including Steven J. Whitmeyer (James Madison University), Declan G. De Paor (Old Dominion), and Christopher L. Atchison (University of Cincinnati)] exploring how technology can provide solutions to solve the problem of access to remote field sites for geoscience students with mobility limitations. The first field season took place this past May in northern Arizona, where she and her colleagues explored several geologically important field sites (including the Grand Canyon, Sedona, Meteor Crater, and volcanic features around Flagstaff). Students who could not get up close to outcrops or hike up cinder cones were able to see many of the same features via streaming video and communicate with the remote field teams to ask questions and speculate about the geologic features in the videos.  The team is presenting some of the initial results at the national Geological Society of America meeting in September, and will be expanding on these results during the second field season in Ireland next May.  More information about the project can be found at http://www.theiagd.org/geopath/– just keep in mind that the project isn’t accepting any more applications. The grant totals $27,000.

The second project, Constraining crater modification and primary ejecta characteristics of Martian craters via quantitative infrared and visible image analysis, has been funded for $292,000 by NASA’s Mars Data Analysis program. She and her colleagues [co-investigators Livio L. Tornabene (SETI) and Nadine Barlow (Northern Arizona University)] are using a suite of datasets to examine impact craters on Mars, with the goal of identifying the characteristics of the least-weathered craters. At CCSU, she and her research students will be working with thermal infrared data, looking for variations in surface temperature associated with different types of crater deposits. Simultaneously, a team at the University of Western Ontario (led by Gordon Osinski) will be mapping the same craters using high resolution visible images. When both maps are finished, they will compare the results (along with information from databases of crater characteristics) in order to understand what surface deposits have come from the formation of the crater, and which are the result of later erosion or deposition. There is room for more student researchers on this project (which will lead to numerous conference presentations and eventually publications), so contact Dr. Piatek if you are interested.

Dr. Thomas, a specialist in science education, has been awarded $144,900 for a second year of funding for the Next-gen Earth and Space Science Literacy Instruction and Expertise or NESSLIE professional development grant project.  This project is funded by a federal grant called the Teacher Quality Partnership Grant under Title II of the No Child Left Behind Act (P.L. 107-110).  NESSLIE aims to improve the preparation of 38 middle school science teachers’ Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) earth science content knowledge and pedagogy through intensive and focused professional development. During the summer of 2016, teacher participants from 13 districts will complete three NGSS earth science units, focusing on weather, the solar system, and weathering and erosion. Department colleagues Dr. Kristine Larsen and Dr. Oluyinka Oyewumi will be presenting the latter two of these units. In the Fall the participating teachers will apply what they have learned in their own classrooms. For more information about this project, please go to https://nesslie.padlet.org/thomasjed/nessliehome

Congratulations to our faculty!